Serotonin enhances oxybuprocaine- and proxymetacaine-induced cutaneous analgesia in rats

An Kuo Chou, Chong Chi Chiu, Jhi Joung Wang, Yu Wen Chen, Ching-Hsia Hung

研究成果: Article

2 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic effects of adding serotonin to oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine preparations. We employed a rat model of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) to conduct the dose-response curves and duration of drugs (oxybuprocaine, proxymetacaine, or serotonin) as an infiltrative anesthetic. The use of isobolographic methods to analyze the drug-drug interactions. We showed that oxybuprocaine and proxymetacaine, as well as serotonin produced dose-dependent skin antinociception. On the basis of 50% effective dose (ED50), the rank order of drug potency was serotonin [7.22 (6.45–8.09) μmol/kg] < oxybuprocaine [1.03 (0.93–1.15) μmol/kg] < proxymetacaine [0.59 (0.53–0.66) μmol/kg] (P < 0.01 for each comparison). The sensory block duration of serotonin was longer (P < 0.01) than that of oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine at the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75). The mixture of serotonin with oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine produced a better analgesic effect than the drug itself. We have concluded that oxybuprocaine, proxymetacaine, or serotonin displays dose-related cutaneous analgesia. Oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine is more potent and has a shorter duration of cutaneous analgesia than serotonin. Serotonin produces a synergistic antinociceptive interaction with oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)73-78
頁數6
期刊European Journal of Pharmacology
846
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2019 三月 5

指紋

benoxinate
Analgesia
Serotonin
Skin
Analgesics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
proxymetacaine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

引用此文

Chou, An Kuo ; Chiu, Chong Chi ; Wang, Jhi Joung ; Chen, Yu Wen ; Hung, Ching-Hsia. / Serotonin enhances oxybuprocaine- and proxymetacaine-induced cutaneous analgesia in rats. 於: European Journal of Pharmacology. 2019 ; 卷 846. 頁 73-78.
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abstract = "The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic effects of adding serotonin to oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine preparations. We employed a rat model of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) to conduct the dose-response curves and duration of drugs (oxybuprocaine, proxymetacaine, or serotonin) as an infiltrative anesthetic. The use of isobolographic methods to analyze the drug-drug interactions. We showed that oxybuprocaine and proxymetacaine, as well as serotonin produced dose-dependent skin antinociception. On the basis of 50{\%} effective dose (ED50), the rank order of drug potency was serotonin [7.22 (6.45–8.09) μmol/kg] < oxybuprocaine [1.03 (0.93–1.15) μmol/kg] < proxymetacaine [0.59 (0.53–0.66) μmol/kg] (P < 0.01 for each comparison). The sensory block duration of serotonin was longer (P < 0.01) than that of oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine at the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75). The mixture of serotonin with oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine produced a better analgesic effect than the drug itself. We have concluded that oxybuprocaine, proxymetacaine, or serotonin displays dose-related cutaneous analgesia. Oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine is more potent and has a shorter duration of cutaneous analgesia than serotonin. Serotonin produces a synergistic antinociceptive interaction with oxybuprocaine or proxymetacaine.",
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Serotonin enhances oxybuprocaine- and proxymetacaine-induced cutaneous analgesia in rats. / Chou, An Kuo; Chiu, Chong Chi; Wang, Jhi Joung; Chen, Yu Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia.

於: European Journal of Pharmacology, 卷 846, 05.03.2019, p. 73-78.

研究成果: Article

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