Source memory in Parkinson's disease

ShuLan Hsieh, Chia Ying Lee

研究成果: Article

14 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Three experiments (ns=14 per group) are reported which investigated the ability of Parkinson patients to remember the characteristics of conditions under which a memory was acquired. In Exp. 1, subjects were required to indicate for each item in a recognition memory test whether it was spoken by Experimenter 1 or by Experimenter 2 (external-external source memory). In Exp. 2, subjects had to indicate for each item whether it was generated by themselves or by the experimenter (internal-external source memory). In Exp. 3, subjects had to judge whether an item was generated by themselves in saying or in thinking (internal-internal source memory). We found that patients with Parkinson's disease were not impaired in the previous two kinds of source memory (Exp. 1 and 2) but were impaired in internal-internal source memory (Exp. 3) relative to the age-matched control groups. In addition, both groups' performance could be improved when given distinctive cues, i.e., perceptual cues in Exp. 1 and different-domain cues in Exp. 2. These results suggest that the availability of cues was critical for Parkinson's disease in source memory. Finally, the result of Exp. 2 also showed generation effects for patients with Parkinson's disease. The generation effect refers to better memory of information by people when they had to produce it, e.g., producing associates to a word, compared with memory of information given to them.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)355-367
頁數13
期刊Perceptual and Motor Skills
89
發行號2
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 1999 一月 1

指紋

Parkinson Disease
Cues
Cohort Effect
Aptitude
Research Design
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

引用此文

Hsieh, ShuLan ; Lee, Chia Ying. / Source memory in Parkinson's disease. 於: Perceptual and Motor Skills. 1999 ; 卷 89, 編號 2. 頁 355-367.
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Source memory in Parkinson's disease. / Hsieh, ShuLan; Lee, Chia Ying.

於: Perceptual and Motor Skills, 卷 89, 編號 2, 01.01.1999, p. 355-367.

研究成果: Article

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