Synergistic effects of serotonin or dopamine combined with lidocaine at producing nociceptive block in rats

Ching Hsia Hung, Chong Chi Chiu, Kuo Sheng Liu, Yu Wen Chen, Jhi Joung Wang

研究成果: Article

9 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the interactions of the local anesthetic lidocaine combined with an agent (serotonin or dopamine) as infiltrative anesthetics. Methods: Cutaneous analgesia was characterized by the blockade of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex following 6 skin pinpricks on the rat back. Serotonin or dopamine at producing cutaneous analgesia in a dosagedependent fashion was compared with lidocaine. Drug-drug interactions were calculated using the isobolographic analysis. Results: We revealed that serotonin, dopamine, and lidocaine provoked dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects. On the 50% effective dose basis, the rank of drugs' potency was found to be serotonin (1.70 [1.56-1.85] μmol) > lidocaine (5.18 [4.67-5.75] μmol) > dopamine (43.0 [40.9-45.2] μmol) (P < 0.01). At doses equivalent to their 25%, 50%, and 75%effective doses, serotonin or dopamine elicited a longer duration of action than lidocaine (P < 0.01) on producing cutaneous analgesia. Coadministration of serotonin or dopamine with lidocaine produced a synergistic effect. Conclusions: The preclinical data showed that serotonin and dopamine produce dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects as an infiltrative anesthetic. Serotonin has a better potency with amuch longer duration of action compared with lidocaine at provoking cutaneous analgesia. Serotonin or dopamine as an adjuvant increases the quality of lidocaine in cutaneous analgesia.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)351-356
頁數6
期刊Regional anesthesia and pain medicine
42
發行號3
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2017 一月 1

指紋

Lidocaine
Dopamine
Serotonin
Skin
Analgesia
Analgesics
Anesthetics
Serotonin Agents
Dopamine Agents
Local Anesthetics
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Reflex
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

引用此文

Hung, Ching Hsia ; Chiu, Chong Chi ; Liu, Kuo Sheng ; Chen, Yu Wen ; Wang, Jhi Joung. / Synergistic effects of serotonin or dopamine combined with lidocaine at producing nociceptive block in rats. 於: Regional anesthesia and pain medicine. 2017 ; 卷 42, 編號 3. 頁 351-356.
@article{9842261a95d94917bcae4e97ddd8538f,
title = "Synergistic effects of serotonin or dopamine combined with lidocaine at producing nociceptive block in rats",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the interactions of the local anesthetic lidocaine combined with an agent (serotonin or dopamine) as infiltrative anesthetics. Methods: Cutaneous analgesia was characterized by the blockade of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex following 6 skin pinpricks on the rat back. Serotonin or dopamine at producing cutaneous analgesia in a dosagedependent fashion was compared with lidocaine. Drug-drug interactions were calculated using the isobolographic analysis. Results: We revealed that serotonin, dopamine, and lidocaine provoked dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects. On the 50{\%} effective dose basis, the rank of drugs' potency was found to be serotonin (1.70 [1.56-1.85] μmol) > lidocaine (5.18 [4.67-5.75] μmol) > dopamine (43.0 [40.9-45.2] μmol) (P < 0.01). At doses equivalent to their 25{\%}, 50{\%}, and 75{\%}effective doses, serotonin or dopamine elicited a longer duration of action than lidocaine (P < 0.01) on producing cutaneous analgesia. Coadministration of serotonin or dopamine with lidocaine produced a synergistic effect. Conclusions: The preclinical data showed that serotonin and dopamine produce dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects as an infiltrative anesthetic. Serotonin has a better potency with amuch longer duration of action compared with lidocaine at provoking cutaneous analgesia. Serotonin or dopamine as an adjuvant increases the quality of lidocaine in cutaneous analgesia.",
author = "Hung, {Ching Hsia} and Chiu, {Chong Chi} and Liu, {Kuo Sheng} and Chen, {Yu Wen} and Wang, {Jhi Joung}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/AAP.0000000000000552",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "351--356",
journal = "Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine",
issn = "1098-7339",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

Synergistic effects of serotonin or dopamine combined with lidocaine at producing nociceptive block in rats. / Hung, Ching Hsia; Chiu, Chong Chi; Liu, Kuo Sheng; Chen, Yu Wen; Wang, Jhi Joung.

於: Regional anesthesia and pain medicine, 卷 42, 編號 3, 01.01.2017, p. 351-356.

研究成果: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synergistic effects of serotonin or dopamine combined with lidocaine at producing nociceptive block in rats

AU - Hung, Ching Hsia

AU - Chiu, Chong Chi

AU - Liu, Kuo Sheng

AU - Chen, Yu Wen

AU - Wang, Jhi Joung

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the interactions of the local anesthetic lidocaine combined with an agent (serotonin or dopamine) as infiltrative anesthetics. Methods: Cutaneous analgesia was characterized by the blockade of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex following 6 skin pinpricks on the rat back. Serotonin or dopamine at producing cutaneous analgesia in a dosagedependent fashion was compared with lidocaine. Drug-drug interactions were calculated using the isobolographic analysis. Results: We revealed that serotonin, dopamine, and lidocaine provoked dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects. On the 50% effective dose basis, the rank of drugs' potency was found to be serotonin (1.70 [1.56-1.85] μmol) > lidocaine (5.18 [4.67-5.75] μmol) > dopamine (43.0 [40.9-45.2] μmol) (P < 0.01). At doses equivalent to their 25%, 50%, and 75%effective doses, serotonin or dopamine elicited a longer duration of action than lidocaine (P < 0.01) on producing cutaneous analgesia. Coadministration of serotonin or dopamine with lidocaine produced a synergistic effect. Conclusions: The preclinical data showed that serotonin and dopamine produce dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects as an infiltrative anesthetic. Serotonin has a better potency with amuch longer duration of action compared with lidocaine at provoking cutaneous analgesia. Serotonin or dopamine as an adjuvant increases the quality of lidocaine in cutaneous analgesia.

AB - Background: The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the interactions of the local anesthetic lidocaine combined with an agent (serotonin or dopamine) as infiltrative anesthetics. Methods: Cutaneous analgesia was characterized by the blockade of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex following 6 skin pinpricks on the rat back. Serotonin or dopamine at producing cutaneous analgesia in a dosagedependent fashion was compared with lidocaine. Drug-drug interactions were calculated using the isobolographic analysis. Results: We revealed that serotonin, dopamine, and lidocaine provoked dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects. On the 50% effective dose basis, the rank of drugs' potency was found to be serotonin (1.70 [1.56-1.85] μmol) > lidocaine (5.18 [4.67-5.75] μmol) > dopamine (43.0 [40.9-45.2] μmol) (P < 0.01). At doses equivalent to their 25%, 50%, and 75%effective doses, serotonin or dopamine elicited a longer duration of action than lidocaine (P < 0.01) on producing cutaneous analgesia. Coadministration of serotonin or dopamine with lidocaine produced a synergistic effect. Conclusions: The preclinical data showed that serotonin and dopamine produce dose-related cutaneous analgesic effects as an infiltrative anesthetic. Serotonin has a better potency with amuch longer duration of action compared with lidocaine at provoking cutaneous analgesia. Serotonin or dopamine as an adjuvant increases the quality of lidocaine in cutaneous analgesia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018761944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018761944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000552

DO - 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000552

M3 - Article

C2 - 28079753

AN - SCOPUS:85018761944

VL - 42

SP - 351

EP - 356

JO - Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

JF - Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

SN - 1098-7339

IS - 3

ER -