Treatment outcomes for one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous esophageal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

Yu Hsuan Lin, Chun Yen Ou, Wei Ting Lee, Yao ‐.Chou Lee, Tzu ‐.Yen Chang, Yi Ting Yen

研究成果: Article

摘要

Purpose: It is not uncommon to see the synchronous presentation of esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC) and head and neck cancer (HNC), and most patients were treated with staged interventions. This study retrospectively reported the outcomes of patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC treated with one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction. Methods: We identified 17 consecutive patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC undergoing primary concurrent surgical resections between 2011 and 2017 at our hospital. All patients had received esophageal screenings prior to treatment. Results: The HNC patients in this study had the following subsite involvements: oral cavity (n = 5), oropharynx (n = 4), larynx (n = 1), hypopharynx (n = 9), and thyroid gland (n = 1). Eighty percent of the HNC subsites (16/20) were treated in advanced stages, while most ESCCs were treated at early stages. The mean follow-up time was 3.2 ± 1.6 years. Surgery-associated morbidity and mortality were 94.1% and 0%, respectively, and the most common complication was anastomotic leakage. The two-year overall survival, 2-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival, and 2-year distant metastasis-free survival were 86.7%, 85.6%, and 78.7%, respectively. No significant difference was found between overall survival and HNC subsite or anastomotic leakage. Four patients (23.5%) developed secondary primary malignancies (SPMs) within a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (standard deviation 1.6 years). Conclusion: Although one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous ESCC and HNC were highly invasive and complicated, survival was promising. Isolated distant metastasis remained the most common failure pattern. Vigilant follow-up strategy is mandatory to detect secondary primary malignancies (SPMs), especially within the first 3 years following initial treatment.

原文English
頁(從 - 到)2929-2940
頁數12
期刊European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
276
發行號10
DOIs
出版狀態Published - 2019 十月 1

指紋

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Survival
Anastomotic Leak
Neoplasm Metastasis
Hypopharynx
Oropharynx
Larynx
Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck
Mouth
Neoplasms
Thyroid Gland
Morbidity
Recurrence
Mortality
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

引用此文

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title = "Treatment outcomes for one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous esophageal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma",
abstract = "Purpose: It is not uncommon to see the synchronous presentation of esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC) and head and neck cancer (HNC), and most patients were treated with staged interventions. This study retrospectively reported the outcomes of patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC treated with one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction. Methods: We identified 17 consecutive patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC undergoing primary concurrent surgical resections between 2011 and 2017 at our hospital. All patients had received esophageal screenings prior to treatment. Results: The HNC patients in this study had the following subsite involvements: oral cavity (n = 5), oropharynx (n = 4), larynx (n = 1), hypopharynx (n = 9), and thyroid gland (n = 1). Eighty percent of the HNC subsites (16/20) were treated in advanced stages, while most ESCCs were treated at early stages. The mean follow-up time was 3.2 ± 1.6 years. Surgery-associated morbidity and mortality were 94.1{\%} and 0{\%}, respectively, and the most common complication was anastomotic leakage. The two-year overall survival, 2-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival, and 2-year distant metastasis-free survival were 86.7{\%}, 85.6{\%}, and 78.7{\%}, respectively. No significant difference was found between overall survival and HNC subsite or anastomotic leakage. Four patients (23.5{\%}) developed secondary primary malignancies (SPMs) within a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (standard deviation 1.6 years). Conclusion: Although one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous ESCC and HNC were highly invasive and complicated, survival was promising. Isolated distant metastasis remained the most common failure pattern. Vigilant follow-up strategy is mandatory to detect secondary primary malignancies (SPMs), especially within the first 3 years following initial treatment.",
author = "Lin, {Yu Hsuan} and Ou, {Chun Yen} and Lee, {Wei Ting} and Lee, {Yao ‐.Chou} and Chang, {Tzu ‐.Yen} and Yen, {Yi Ting}",
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T1 - Treatment outcomes for one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous esophageal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

AU - Lin, Yu Hsuan

AU - Ou, Chun Yen

AU - Lee, Wei Ting

AU - Lee, Yao ‐.Chou

AU - Chang, Tzu ‐.Yen

AU - Yen, Yi Ting

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Purpose: It is not uncommon to see the synchronous presentation of esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC) and head and neck cancer (HNC), and most patients were treated with staged interventions. This study retrospectively reported the outcomes of patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC treated with one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction. Methods: We identified 17 consecutive patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC undergoing primary concurrent surgical resections between 2011 and 2017 at our hospital. All patients had received esophageal screenings prior to treatment. Results: The HNC patients in this study had the following subsite involvements: oral cavity (n = 5), oropharynx (n = 4), larynx (n = 1), hypopharynx (n = 9), and thyroid gland (n = 1). Eighty percent of the HNC subsites (16/20) were treated in advanced stages, while most ESCCs were treated at early stages. The mean follow-up time was 3.2 ± 1.6 years. Surgery-associated morbidity and mortality were 94.1% and 0%, respectively, and the most common complication was anastomotic leakage. The two-year overall survival, 2-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival, and 2-year distant metastasis-free survival were 86.7%, 85.6%, and 78.7%, respectively. No significant difference was found between overall survival and HNC subsite or anastomotic leakage. Four patients (23.5%) developed secondary primary malignancies (SPMs) within a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (standard deviation 1.6 years). Conclusion: Although one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous ESCC and HNC were highly invasive and complicated, survival was promising. Isolated distant metastasis remained the most common failure pattern. Vigilant follow-up strategy is mandatory to detect secondary primary malignancies (SPMs), especially within the first 3 years following initial treatment.

AB - Purpose: It is not uncommon to see the synchronous presentation of esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC) and head and neck cancer (HNC), and most patients were treated with staged interventions. This study retrospectively reported the outcomes of patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC treated with one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction. Methods: We identified 17 consecutive patients with synchronous ESCC and HNC undergoing primary concurrent surgical resections between 2011 and 2017 at our hospital. All patients had received esophageal screenings prior to treatment. Results: The HNC patients in this study had the following subsite involvements: oral cavity (n = 5), oropharynx (n = 4), larynx (n = 1), hypopharynx (n = 9), and thyroid gland (n = 1). Eighty percent of the HNC subsites (16/20) were treated in advanced stages, while most ESCCs were treated at early stages. The mean follow-up time was 3.2 ± 1.6 years. Surgery-associated morbidity and mortality were 94.1% and 0%, respectively, and the most common complication was anastomotic leakage. The two-year overall survival, 2-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival, and 2-year distant metastasis-free survival were 86.7%, 85.6%, and 78.7%, respectively. No significant difference was found between overall survival and HNC subsite or anastomotic leakage. Four patients (23.5%) developed secondary primary malignancies (SPMs) within a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (standard deviation 1.6 years). Conclusion: Although one-stage concurrent surgical resection and reconstruction of synchronous ESCC and HNC were highly invasive and complicated, survival was promising. Isolated distant metastasis remained the most common failure pattern. Vigilant follow-up strategy is mandatory to detect secondary primary malignancies (SPMs), especially within the first 3 years following initial treatment.

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U2 - 10.1007/s00405-019-05564-9

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